Archive for the 'Guns' Category



Off-Duty Correction Officer Shoots Himself And Woman While Showing Off At Hell’s Kitchen Bar

BY Herschel Smith
3 days, 15 hours ago

NY Daily News:

He just had to show off his gun.

Police arrested an off-duty city correction officer who brandished his gun in a Hell’s Kitchen restaurant to impress two women – then accidentally shot himself in the finger and one of his companions in her right foot, officials said Wednesday.

Correction Officer Mario Carrillo was charged with assault and reckless endangerment for the boneheaded move inside the Mamasita Bar & Grill on 10th Ave. near W. 54th St. on Tuesday night.
The 56-year-old guard, a five-year employee of the Department of Correction, had joined two women at the restaurant at about 8 p.m. and was talking about his job when he pulled out his off-duty Glock to show them how it worked, officials said.

A moment later, the pistol went off.

“It appears he may have been displaying it,” a police source said.

Well gosh.  I just hate it when that happens to me.  We always laugh, and laugh, and laugh if the wounded ones are willing to laugh about it and shrug it off.

Notice the third person the author applies in the article, as if the gun has a personality of its own and does things volitionally.  “A moment later, the pistol went off.”

Remember boys and girls.  Only authorized journalists can be considered professional writers.  And only LEOs are tactically well trained enough to handle guns.

Solving The LEO Problem With Open Carry

BY Herschel Smith
3 days, 16 hours ago

Robert Farago at TTAG writes about Columbia Police Chief Skip Holbrook’s invective against open carry.  Two days after I did.  One commenter writes:

“Open-carry law or not, when citizens see someone with a gun, they will call the police. When responding to “person with a gun” calls…”

When someone calls 911 to report a ‘man with a gun’ ask what he was doing. Unless the answer establishes reasonable suspicion of criminal activity, tell the person that open carrying is lawful and end the call.

Hey look, I solved the problem.

Um, except that I solved it two days earlier when I said this.

It would be a good opportunity for 911 services to educate people on the new state law.  “Ma’am, what was he doing with the gun?  Was he brandishing it or pointing it at someone?”  No.  “Well then, he wasn’t breaking any laws.  Open carry is legal in South Carolina.”

Well, he was acting erratically.  “Hmmm … what do you mean by that?”  Well, I don’t know, he just seemed shifty.  “Ma’am, seeming shifty isn’t illegal.  Please hang up and call us when there is a law or regulation being broken.  Otherwise, you are wasting our time.”

This conversation is entirely plausible.  Don’t discount it as an example to follow for 911 operators, or classroom material.

Or more than a year ago when I dealt with Texas open carry and LEOs objected the same thing.  Or even longer ago than that whenever open carry comes up in whatever state it does.

But Robert’s readers wouldn’t know anything about what other gun rights bloggers say because Robert doesn’t link other gun rights bloggers.  Or if they do know anything about what other people are saying, they’re not getting it from Robert.

Columbia Police Chief Skip Holbrook Inveighs Against South Carolina Open Carry

BY Herschel Smith
5 days, 15 hours ago

The State:

Columbia, SC – Although law enforcement has always been a challenging, difficult and dangerous job, the past few years have been some of the most challenging ever.

Far fewer people are choosing to go into law enforcement, and many experienced officers are leaving the field, making it difficult for police agencies to maintain adequate staffing levels, all while violent crime is on the rise in many large cities. Columbia is not immune to this trend. Targeted attacks on law enforcement (Dallas, Baton Rouge) and a rise in line-of-duty deaths have further complicated an incredibly stressful and dangerous job.

It’s against this backdrop that the S.C. House passed a bill to make it legal for people to openly carry handguns in the state, with certain location exceptions. The bill won’t become law this year, but it will be front and center when lawmakers return to Columbia in January, and we need to understand its implications.

The right to bear arms is fundamental to our democracy, but the sale, purchase, ownership and carrying of guns comes with great responsibility and use of common sense, and I firmly believe an open-carry law will significantly complicate police interactions with citizens, resulting in many unintended consequences.

Open-carry law or not, when citizens see someone with a gun, they will call the police. When responding to “person with a gun” calls, officers have few details to help them quickly determine an armed individual’s intent and whether that person poses a threat to public safety or the individual.

No doubt, we would encounter many innocent, law-abiding people who were armed in compliance with an open carry law. But some will be violent criminals, perhaps even gang members, who don’t yet have a felony on their record that prohibits them from possessing weapons.

Also let’s not forget the numerous and frequent protests, demonstrations and marches in our city. Open carry could make it extraordinarily difficult for police to protect those exercising their right to assemble and protest peacefully. There is no denying that easily accessible firearms add fuel to already emotionally charged situations, which too often results in tragedy.

Recently, Columbia police officers answered a call about a “person with a gun acting erratically” at a local Wal-Mart. It was just the second day on the job for one of the responding officers. Upon their arrival, the officers were easily able to identify the suspect, but because he was in a store with many innocent people nearby, the officers allowed him to leave the store before engaging with him. Obviously, this was a tense, dangerous situation, putting a large number of our citizens and our officers at risk as the armed suspect moved from Wal-Mart through a parking lot and into another business, ignoring officers’ commands.

Imagine this same scenario if South Carolina had an open-carry law.

Conceivably, there could have been many individuals with weapons displayed when officers arrived, making it extremely difficult to distinguish between the suspect(s), accomplices and innocent bystanders.

This entire line of argument is so full of shit I barely know where to begin.  There is a deeper problem here than just his argumentation, but I’ll get to that after I spend a few paragraphs fisking his invective.

He begins by invoking memories of the Dallas cop shooting and the possible implications of open carry for response to that event.  But as we’ve covered concerning that event, the Dallas police on the scene responded to the shooter based on their knowledge of his location and eventually killed him with robotics and explosive ordnance (if I’m not mistaken, the first of its kind in American history, which might also have implications for due process – what if he wasn’t the real shooter?).

The alleged open carrier was toting a rifle slung across his back, entirely legal in Texas even then, and police “identified” him as a “suspect” via social media.  He wasn’t a suspect, he was guilty of nothing, and social media was worthless in that situation.  The investigation of social media wasn’t conducted by LEOs on the scene of the shooting, and thus no resources (used to respond to the individual who allegedly did the shooting) were taken up with this “investigation.”  It was entirely wasted effort to prove nothing, including the notion that open carry had something to do with the event.  The investigation didn’t affect LEOs on the scene in any way, shape or form.  It didn’t stop them, and it didn’t help them.  It was completely irrelevant to everything that happened that night.

So based on this, we know that Holbrook’s invocation of Dallas fails on every point.  Next, Holbrook invokes the idea that calls will be made to the police.  To which we may respond, so what?  It would be a good opportunity for 911 services to educate people on the new state law.  “Ma’am, what was he doing with the gun?  Was he brandishing it or pointing it at someone?”  No.  “Well then, he wasn’t breaking any laws.  Open carry is legal in South Carolina.”

Well, he was acting erratically.  “Hmmm … what do you mean by that?”  Well, I don’t know, he just seemed shifty.  “Ma’am, seeming shifty isn’t illegal.  Please hang up and call us when there is a law or regulation being broken.  Otherwise, you are wasting our time.”

This conversation is entirely plausible.  Don’t discount it as an example to follow for 911 operators, or classroom material.  But then Holbrook begins the weirdest exploration in this whole commentary when he discusses the notion of violent gang members who have never committed a felony and have no record.  To which we might all ask, “What the hell are you talking about?”

If you want to invoke gun ownership generally, then your invective targets too much because criminals bent on harm can conceal as well as carry openly.  You, Mr. Holbrook, began by asserting that there is a right to carry weapons, and you have devolved into violent people (who have absolutely no record) having guns, which has nothing to do with open carry which is the supposed topic of this article.  Good Lord, man.  Take a class in rhetoric or logic.

That violent people who have been found guilty via due process are already prohibited from purchasing weapons via form 4473 isn’t mentioned because it doesn’t fit your narrative.  Your narrative is that we need you to perform this function, and clearly we don’t.

I say clearly because for the final problem I’ll mention (there are so many I have to draw the line somewhere), you completely ignore the operating data from right across the state line in North Carolina where we are a “gold star” traditional open carry state.  None of the problems you say obtain actually do in North Carolina, and we have cities too, and we have beaches, and we have sprawling urban areas, and rural areas, and mountains, and whatever you have.  We have more of it.  Open carry simply hasn’t been the problem you say it should be.  And if the data proves you wrong, then you’re wrong.

But that leads me to the final anchor of my response.  I smell a rat.  No, not Holbrook, although he seems rattish enough to me, but the rat I smell ensconces in the South Carolina Senate.  There may be many of them.  I have called most senates dens of iniquity housing gargoyles and demons.  I think I’m correct in that assessment.

I suspect this.  I suspect that South Carolina senators don’t really want to do this because they are cop suckers.  They delayed this just long enough that it forces it to the next session of the senate.  It’s easy enough, and it could have hit the governor’s desk, but it was delayed.  We all know it.  Just admit the truth.  They delayed this so that cops could inveigh against the proposal.  If a cop says it, it must be right.  We are law and order people.  After all, we support cops, right?

But lawmakers have no more right to dictate how we carry our weapons that they do to dictate whether we have them in the first pace.  All gun control laws are an infringement on our God-given rights to bear arms, and thus they are immoral.

I’m disappointed in the commentary, Holbrook.  Give me some real red meat to chew on.  This one was too easy.

Remington Ordered To Pay $500,000 In Personal Injury Case

BY Herschel Smith
5 days, 16 hours ago

Guns.com:

A federal judged ruled against Remington Arms in a personal injury case despite arguments that the gun maker is protected under Louisiana law.

Judge Ivan Lemelle ruled that the case has merit under the Louisiana Products Liability Act, saying the law protects gun makers from lawsuits except in cases involving a defective firearm. He awarded $500,000 to the plaintiff, Precious Seguin, for her claim holding Remington liable for producing a defective product.

According to court documents, Seguin was injured during a hunting excursion in October 2013. As she tracked the blood trail of a wounded deer with her father, brother and a family friend, her father’s Remington 710 bolt-action rifle discharged as they made their way through the brush. The bullet struck her right buttock, traveled through her hip and exited through her right elbow.

The lawsuit argues the rifle’s trigger design, the infamous Walker Fire Control, a mechanism that has been linked to almost a dozen deaths and numerous injuries, allowed the gun to discharge without the pull of a trigger. In Seguin’s case, her father had the rifle strapped over his shoulder and pointed upward until a branch knocked it up and backward, at which time the safety moved to the fire position and unintentionally discharged. Before Seguin was injured, they had not experienced an unintentional discharge with the rifle.

So this is more on the Walker Fire Control System.  Good grief, people.  I was among the most vocal critics of Remington on the gun blogs, using my engineering credentials to advocate that Remington had misled their constituency and gun buyers, and in fact they’re still lying.  The Remington 700 has indeed been tested to fire when the trigger isn’t being pulled.  Their own test data shows it.  Good Lord!  Their own test data shows it.

But how far do we take this?  Now that Remington has settled the issue in court, it’s finished.  Let it go.  Everyone who knows anything about guns – and you shouldn’t be a hunter if you don’t know anything about guns – knows what Remington has been charged with, and knows that Remington settled.

Legal settlements mean something or they don’t.  Besides, I don’t know what really happened on that day Seguin was injured since I wasn’t there, and neither do any of my readers, and neither does the idiot judge who ordered this payout.

It’s time to put this to bed.  It’s finished.  Buy Remington, or don’t.  It matters not to me.  But this issue is closed as far as I’m concerned.  I hope Remington’s lawyers end this swiftly and surely.  If they don’t, let me make it clear.  At this point I have no compassion left for people who want to sue Remington for damages from a trigger system that has been recalled.  Do your homework, people.

 

Maj. Gen. Scales Traffics In Half Century Old Rhetoric On Stoner Design

BY Herschel Smith
6 days, 16 hours ago

Task & Purpose:

Retired Army Maj. Gen. Robert Scales hates the M16 family of rifles, and he won’t stop until everyone knows it.

Scales has spent the last few years railing against the standard-issue infantry rifle as little more than a lighter but less effective version of the infamous M16 model that left so many American troops dead in the jungles of Vietnam (In response to Scales’ condemnation of the M4 in the pages of The Atlantic in January 2015, Task & Purpose’s Christian Beekman mounted a vocal defense of the rifle).

Wednesday was no different. Appearing before the Senate Armed Services Committee, Scales decried the Department of Defense’s post-World War II small-arms programs as “inferior.” Thousands of American troops “have died because the Army’s weapon buying bureaucracy has consistently denied that a soldier’s individual weapon is important enough to gain their serious attention,” said Scales in his prepared testimony.

“A soldier in basic training is told that his rifle is his best friend and his ticket home,” he told assembled lawmakers. “If the lives of so many depend on a rifle why can’t the richest country in the world give it to them?”

[ … ]

To their credit, DoD officials are moving slowly but surely to outfit ground forces with new weaponry. In November, the Marine Corps’ 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines began conducting pre-deployment exercises to evaluate the M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle as a replacement for the M4, which replaced the M16A4 in infantry battalions in 2015.

“It is the best infantry rifle in the world, hands down,” Chief Warrant Officer 5 Christian Wade told Military.com of the IAR at the time. “Better than anything Russia has, it’s better than anything we have, it’s better than anything China has. It’s world-class.”

This is a weird article.  As soon as the author is done with Scales, he launches into a discussion about how the DoD gets it with the USMC work on the IAC – which I would point out, is a 5.56 mm gun.

This is the same, tired old rhetoric we saw half century ago, and the alleged problems Scales likes to cite have all gone away.  McThag summarizes.

The M16A1 and its M193 ammunition stopped being the standard more than thirty years ago and was replaced with the M16A2 and M855.

The M16A2, where almost every part was revised, isn’t even the standard today; that’d be the M4A1.

M855, even, is on its way out with the advent of M855A1.

In a nutshell, everything that was causing problems in 1969 has been revised and replaced.  The bore diameter didn’t cause those three guys you constantly cite to die with broken rifles.

It’s far more likely the lackluster quality control from the mighty UAW workforce at Colt had more to do with it than the design.

To former Major Ehrhart; the infantry half kilometer was “lost” to artillery.

Remember combined arms?

Well, the max effective range of the small arms overlaps the normal range of artillery.  So, yes, the infantry half kilometer demands a larger bore size, I suggest 60mm for starters.  Willard even posits that the reason we’re having problems in Afghanistan is the enemy has figured out where our small arms peter out and won’t close; because to close is to die.  If to close is to die, then it means our weapons do work.

Don’t use logic on Scales.  He won’t listen, or he’ll cite the battle of Wanat, where we ensconced a platoon of soldiers in a valley after letting enemy fighters prepare for a total of one year to attack them with a battalion size force.  Scales blamed that one on the M4 too.

And don’t tell Scales that the Army doesn’t teach soldiers to shoot anymore.  He won’t listen.  Because shut up.

If you want to have a larger bore weapon, then buy one.  I have a larger bore rifle than the 5.56 mm too.  But remember that you always give up something to get something, and that all decisions concerning weapons selection are a compromise.

As for Scales, who exactly pays this guy to continue to work the Stoner system over with false rhetoric?

Note To Rock River Arms

BY Herschel Smith
1 week, 4 days ago

RRA responds:

Larson took after the good folks at The Truth About Guns, which she referred to as an ‘activist website’. “This boils down to a small, so-called gun-rights activist website that took the majority of things out of context, to make it sound like Rock River Arms and Springfield Armory were IFMA,” she said. “We did not have control over all actions. IFMA acted autonomously on our behalf.”

[ … ]

Larson then decried Illinois politics, which have almost become a blood sport.“I can’t get into all the details of the politics, as this is still a very real threat,” she told Mark. “Now, we are left with partial truth and fake news driving wedges between the different parts of our firearms community.”

Listen to me.  This is the wrong response.  The only wedge that has been driven is between RRA and your customer base.  The gun community – at least as far as I can tell – is pretty much in full agreement on this issue.

I don’t particularly care for TTAG either.  Their writers resolutely refuse to link anyone or exchange traffic, or frankly even debate issues within the gun community by their completely ignoring other gun web sites.  I once sent Robert a link and he responded that he would be happy to publish me as a writer if he gets the first 24 hours before I post the article to my own site.

Um … no.  That isn’t how this works.  But in spite of the disagreements between me and TTAG, they followed this issue fairly well and published the full truth as far as I can tell.  If not, then challenge the facts.  Don’t call them “fake news,” or “activist website,” or a “so-called gun rights web site.”

That’s insulting.  I wouldn’t even do that.

South Carolina Firearms Retention Bill

BY Herschel Smith
1 week, 5 days ago

Guns.com:

The pro-gun bill, H. 3429 sponsored by Republican Rep. Alan Clemmons, was passed last week by the South Carolina Senate on a 35-3 vote. The House unanimously concurred, sending the measure to Gov. Henry McMaster for consideration.

If signed by the governor, the bill will allow those filing for bankruptcy to retain up to three firearms, so long as the total value of those firearms does not exceed $3,000.

Hannah Hill, a policy analyst for the South Carolina Policy Council, a conservative think tank, argued in The Nerve that guns should not be exempted from bankruptcy.

“There is no reason to exempt guns from bankruptcy except for the fact that they’re, you know, guns,” Hill said. “And here’s where Second Amendment rights activists often go off the rails: government may not stand in the way of the free exercise of a right, but it is under no obligation to ensure that you DO exercise that right or that you have the wherewithal to do so. If chronic laryngitis kept you from exercising your First Amendment rights, the government wouldn’t be obligated to pay for your treatment.”

The National Rifle Association has supported the bill all the way, with its Institute for Legislative Action describing the legislation as a measure meant to “recognize the fundamental right to personal protection by ensuring citizens who have fallen on hard times, financially, will not be required to sell all of their firearms maintained for personal protection in order to satisfy their debts.”

And here’s where Hill goes off the rails.  Let’s suppose that a woman goes off the deep end, starts running around with another man and then files for divorce, essentially taking the man for just about all he’s worth and forcing him to start over in life in middle age.

Think it can’t happen?  I know two men whom I love very deeply to whom that has happened.  Bankruptcy was in store for one of them, and he had to liquidate his entire gun collection for her.  This bill prevents that from happening.

But here is my disappointment.  The South Carolina senate has proven that it can actually pass a pro-gun bill and send it to the governor’s desk.  They can also do that with open carry and constitutional carry, but chose to lock it down in committee until it died for this session.

For this reason the S.C. state senators have a bulls eye painted on their backs.  I won’t forget.  Gun owners won’t forget.  This bill is a weak installment for gun rights, and doesn’t even come close to making up for not passing constitutional carry.  Weak tea won’t suffice, gentlemen.

Single Worst Firearm You’ve Ever Owned, And Why?

BY Herschel Smith
1 week, 6 days ago

At reddit/r/firearms there is an interesting discussion thread about the single worst firearm you’ve ever owned, and why?

Remington, Hi Point and Taurus play big in this thread.  What firearm would you put in that category?  What is the single worst firearm you’ve ever owned, and why?

The Indiana Supreme Court On Open Carry

BY Herschel Smith
2 weeks, 3 days ago

Guy Relford writing at WIBC.com:

On Monday, the Indiana Supreme Court issued its much-anticipated ruling in Thomas Pinner v. State, which addresses the issue of whether police officers may detain and question a person based only on a report that the individual has a gun.  In agreeing with the Indiana Court of Appeals’ decision handed down last August, the Supreme Court ruled that officers violated the Fourth Amendment’s protection against unreasonable searches and seizures when they detained and questioned Thomas Pinner after a taxi driver called 911 to report that Pinner had dropped a handgun when exiting a cab at a movie theater.

Under rules announced by the U.S. Supreme Court in the 1968 case of Terry v. Ohio, a police officer may briefly detain and question a person if the officer has a “reasonable articulable suspicion” that the person is engaged in criminal activity (or in the words of SCOTUS, “that criminal activity is afoot”).  If the officer also has a reasonable suspicion that the person “may be armed and dangerous,” the officer may conduct a brief pat-down of the person’s outer clothing to check for weapons.  Together, this process is called “stop and frisk” or a “Terry stop.”

Before the Indiana Supreme Court’s ruling on Monday, there has been a long-standing debate in Indiana.  On one side, many police officers and prosecutors have argued that a Terry stop is justified based on a report that a person is carrying a gun – or an officer’s own observation that the person has a handgun – because the officer has a “reasonable suspicion” that the person is carrying a handgun illegally until the officer confirms that the person has a handgun license.  On the other hand, defense attorneys and Second Amendment advocates have countered that the mere possession of a handgun, without some additional indication that such possession is illegal, does not justify the detention of the individual to investigate – much like police are not allowed to randomly stop vehicles to confirm that a motorist has a driver’s license.

In the opinion handed down last August by the Indiana Court of Appeals (and written by highly-regarded Judge Melissa May), Indiana resolved that issue for the time being by holding that “the mere possession of a handgun, which is legal, cannot produce reasonable suspicion to justify a Terry Stop.”  The court went on to state that “the State has not directed us to a reason why the police believed when they stopped Pinner that his possession of the gun was illegal, nor has the State asserted any other criminal activity was ‘afoot.’  Accordingly, we are constrained to hold the stop of Pinner was not supported by reasonable suspicion.”  Thus, without a basis to believe that Pinner was carrying a handgun without a license – or engaged in some other illegal activity – detaining Pinner to investigate his possession of a gun violated his rights under the Fourth Amendment.

In Monday’s opinion, the Supreme Court wholly agreed with Judge May’s analysis.  Specifically, the court ruled that a police officer, based only on a tip that a person possesses a handgun, may not detain that person to confirm that he has a license to carry …

[ … ]

Said the ruling:

“The United States Supreme Court has previously declared that law enforcement may not arbitrarily detain an individual to ensure compliance with licensing and registration laws without particularized facts supporting an inference of illegal conduct. See Prouse, 440 U.S. at 663 (‘hold[ing] that except in those situations in which there is at least articulable and reasonable suspicion that a motorist is unlicensed or that an automobile is not registered, or that either the vehicle or an occupant is otherwise subject to seizure for violation of law, stopping an automobile and detaining the driver in order to check his driver’s license and the registration of the automobile are unreasonable under the Fourth Amendment’). In like fashion, we decline to endorse such behavior to ensure compliance with Indiana’s gun licensing laws.” 

This case is actually similar to the case of Nathanial Black decided by the Fourth Circuit.

Nathaniel Black was part of a group of men in Charlotte, North Carolina who local police officers suspected might be engaged in criminal activity. In particular, Officers suspected that after seeing one of the men openly carrying a firearm – which was legal in North Carolina – that there was most likely another firearm present. When police began frisking the men one by one, Mr. Black wished to leave, but was told he was not free to leave. Officers chased Mr. Black and discovered that he possessed a firearm; it was later discovered that he was a previously convicted felon. Mr. Black was charged with being a felon in possession of a firearm. Before the United States District Court for the Western District of North Carolina, Mr. Black moved to suppress the evidence against him. His suppression motion was denied, he entered a guilty plea preserving a right to appeal the denial of the suppression motion, and he was sentenced to fifteen (15) years imprisonment. The United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, however, determined that the officers had improperly seized Mr. Black, suppressed the evidence against him, and vacated his sentence.

Like Indiana, North Carolina is an open carry state.  Simply openly carrying a gun isn’t grounds for detention.  It must be a so-called “Terry Stop,” and openly carrying a weapon, since it is entirely within the law, isn’t justifiable reason to detain an individual.

The Indiana Supreme Court got this right.  I’ve argued similarly against the new open carry law in Texas, pointing out that “… licensed open carry in a state with no stop and identify statute for enforcement is a shooting-by-cop waiting to happen.  And I certainly don’t support empowering the police state any more by giving them a stop and identify statute.  That would be making something bad even worse.”  As stops must be Terry Stops, and since Texas has no stop and identify statute, and shouldn’t because they are unconstitutional (despite what the courts have said), LEOs in Texas are left with no direction concerning open carriers.

I don’t want LEOs in Texas to be given more direction, any more than I want that for LEOs in Indiana.  I advocate simple observation of God-given rights, and living by the covenant to which we are all obliged, i.e., the constitution.

Affordable Chassis Precision Rifles

BY Herschel Smith
2 weeks, 4 days ago

I knew if I waited long enough, the nice precision chassis rifles would become affordable.  Companies won’t decide to forego making products if they can turn a profit, they’ll just let the market seek its own equilibrium.

Bergara has done a nice job with their B-14 Hunting and Match Rifle (HMR).

Bergara Rifles, a division of BPI Outdoors, is pleased to announce its Bergara B-14 Hunting and Match Rifle (HMR) has won the Outdoor Life Editor’s Choice Award for 2017.

Over several days of shooting, Outdoor Life tested all of the new rifles for 2017. Drills were done to mimic practical shooting positions. The rifles were shot for accuracy off the bench and tested for reliability by being shot in a way to try and induce malfunctions. Each firearm was taken apart and inspected to ascertain the quality of manufacturing and the amount of innovation put into each firearm. The rifles were tested by a group of five independent judges and were evaluated on 10 different categories. In each of these 10 categories, each rifle was scored using a scale from 1-10. After the shooting stopped and the dust settled, the B-14 HMR came out on top.

But I have to say, I own a Tikka T-3, and they have also entered this market with their new T3x TAC A1.  The Tikka is a bit more pricey at around $1600 – $1700, while the Bergara is around $1100.


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