Archive for the 'Firearms' Category



Gun Controllers In The Land Down Under And The Land Of The Maple Leaf

BY Herschel Smith
1 month, 2 weeks ago

We fought that battle a couple hundred years ago, and there was no way that Lord Cornwallis was going to beat Francis Marion and his irregular warfare in South Carolina.  Marion bled them to the point of ineffectiveness, and the war for independence was essentially won.

Australia and Canada are still subjects of the Queen, so to speak, and their system still recognizes the supremacy of the centralized government rather than innate human rights, granted by God.  That’s too bad.  We see the effects of this in their gun laws.

Consider Australia:

A SOUTHERN Downs farmer has lost his fight to possess a handgun to kill the feral dogs he traps on his 604-hectare cattle property.

John James Shaxson, whose property west of Warwick borders Durikai Forest on the west, has been trapping feral dogs on his property since 2012 and trapping feral pigs since about 2000.

He grazes and breeds between 50 and 115 cattle depending on conditions on his property which he says is hilly and rough with an actual surface area more like 2000 hectares.

Mr Shaxson told the Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal that he needed a handgun because he used a quad bike to get to inaccessible areas where he set traps and already had lots of equipment to carry.

He told the tribunal his rifle would catch on foliage walking through to the traps and it was dangerous shooting dogs with it because a bullet might ricochet off a steel trap.

QCAT member Michelle Howard said Mr Shaxson also wanted the 22 magnum handgun to have better aim shooting feral pigs he caught in mesh cages.

She said he admitted he had shot only six dogs in total after they were caught in the steel traps but was less forthcoming on pigs – saying he sometimes caught six to eight at a time and another time just two.

“He considered it was a requirement for the dogs, but for the pigs, it would be a bonus,” she said.

“Although a handgun may be desirable from his perspective to euthanise feral dogs in particular, I am satisfied that the other weapons licences and weapons he already holds and uses are appropriate to meet his occupational requirements.”

She’s satisfied, the report tell us.  She’s satisfied, regardless of the state of the man who needed the gun.  Now consider Canada:

Applications to carry handguns have skyrocketed in B.C. and Alberta in the past three years – likely driven by demand among people who work in the bush and want portable protection against wildlife.

Rates have held steady in the rest of Canada, according to RCMP figures show released in response to an access-to-information request.

We don’t know how many of these applications were approved because the RCMP won’t tell us.

We also don’t know how many were for concealed-carry permits for people facing “criminal threats” and how many are for openly carrying handguns in wilderness areas to defend against wildlife. RCMP Staff. Sgt. Julie Gagnon refused to break out the two categories.

The RCMP’s access-to-information office also refused to make that distinction, citing a section of the federal Access to Information Act exempting “information the disclosure of which could reasonably be expected to threaten the safety of individuals.”

What we do know is that more people are submitting these applications for “authorizations to carry” : The number of applications across the country rose from 386 to 564 between 2011 and 2013.

In that time period, they more than doubled in B.C.; in Alberta, they more than doubled from 2011 to 2012.

People in the territories submit far more application rates than the rest of Canada. The Yukon had 33 applications in 2013 – almost one for every 1,000 residents – while the Northwest Territories had 29. By contrast, Quebec’s 64 applications make for fewer than one for every 100,000 residents.

The number of applications and the authorizations issued are about the same, says Ontario’s chief firearms officer, OPP Supt. Chris Wyatt.

” If somebody applies for an ATC and it’s really deficient – they’re not a prospector, they don’t have a wilderness occupation, they just want it when they go camping –we just say ‘You don’t qualify,’ and they don’t pursue their application.”

We just say, “you don’t qualify.”  They just seem to give up at that point.  As for those of us who fought a war over this several hundred years ago, take note that no permission is necessary when God is the author of our rights.  And we fought a war over this once – we can do it again.

Notes From HPS

BY Herschel Smith
1 month, 3 weeks ago

David Codrea:

That black gun rights activists are treated differently than white ones over the same advocacy issue is racist, pure and simple. But then again, what do I know, being what an official representative of a national gun ban group dismissed as “a white gun nut”?

Yea, it is, and you know what else is racist?  All Jim Crow laws regarding gun purchase and ownership.  So when you hear CLEOs oppose shall issue laws and talk about how they really have their finger on the pulse of the community and can tell if someone is a potential danger when the NICS can’t … blah blah blah … they’re really saying, “We don’t want those horrible black folk to have guns, do we?”  They’re bigots, pure and simple.

Kurt Hofmann:

Johnson accuses the NRA of “falsely arguing that .50 caliber weapons pose no threat to the general public,” despite there being not a single documented case of a person in the U.S. having been killed with a rifle chambered for the .50 BMG cartridge, and despite the rifles having been on the civilian market ever since Ronnie Barrett sold his first “Barrett Light Fifty” forty-two years ago.

Kurt goes on to explain the artificial use of sources – that is, making things up because you think the reader won’t actually go there and find out for himself.  I find Media Matters amusing, but note that I didn’t say interesting.  Kurt is known (by me at least) for his use of logic.  David Codrea is no mean analyst himself, but one thing you also get with David is clever post titles, clever prose, and illustrative commentary that invokes memories that most people share in common in order to explain a point.  When you read Media Matters, their title lines aren’t even interesting.  They go like this: “Someone said thus-and-such when he really should have said so-and-so, and he’s not sorry about it.”  It’s awful, really.  Media Matters is the most boring, dull, dreary, dry, and annoying site on the web, and there are a lot of dreary sites on the web.

Kurt Hofmann:

A Constitutionally guaranteed, fundamental human right of the individual, and these people demand the power to take it away without a conviction, without an indictment, without an arrest or formal charges, and now without “concrete facts” or “irrefutable evidence.” They seem more than a little confused as to who the “terrorists” here are–perhaps a mirror would help.

And there is an increasing willingness to affect the lives of good people based on whether they might in the future pose some sort of undefined risk, as if it’s possible to prove a universal negative.

Kurt Hofmann:

… there is perhaps an even more glaring contradiction in this proposed amendment to the Missouri constitution. The language of the amendment, while providing an explicit statement that the right to keep and bear arms is “unalienable,” also contains a provision granting the state explicit permission to “alien” that right …

Well, first of all, I’m quick to say I don’t believe in the second amendment, I believe in God, and He gives me my rights, not the state.  However, it is  helpful for the state to recognize that fact and make it explicit for everyone, and in this case it sounds like they are making matters worse.  Best to leave it alone until they really believe in unalienable rights – and in God.

Via David Codrea, Liston Matthews puts some tough questions to Ben Carson.  David will be watching.  So will I.  I consider Allen West a much better man all around, although not electable.  In fact, it doesn’t appear that anyone I like is electable.  Why even vote?  If the GOP fields someone like Chris Christie or Jeb Bush, I’ll stay at home and laugh.

Sharia Law In America:

“Two leaders of a mosque tried to cut off the hand of a man they allege stole jars of money from the house of worship, Philadelphia police said … Investigators say the two males accused the victim of stealing jars of money from the Masjid … The males, police say, dragged the victim to the rear of the property and attempted to cut off his hand with a machete.”

You are buying guns and ammunition, right?

ZeroHedge: The American Economy is a Ponzi Scheme: “Financial bubbles are what economist Robert Shiller calls “naturally occurring Ponzis” because the psychology of ever-rising prices and profits fuels an inflow of greater fools that sustains the bubble until all available greater fools have sunk their cash and credit into the bubble.”  Then the ponzi paint peels away to show the rotten wood of the economy.

WRSA: The Secret Government Rulebook For Labeling You A Terrorist.

And via Mike, the comment of the week: “A system built upon debt must eventually reach a debt saturation point. We are already there as world wide assets are dwarfed by world wide debt and the inability to paythe interest. Thus central banks have already resorted to their last hope – money printing. That inevitably leads to currency destruction, chaos, and the breakdown of society.”

And speaking of honesty and clarity, Mike says it short and sweet.  As for me, I don’t care if you wear a uniform or not.  If you’re the enemy, you’re the enemy.  And anyone who tries to take my weapons is the enemy.

Finally, Guns.com gives us the ultimate home defense handgun guide.  Meh.  There’s nothing ultimate about it.  He doesn’t even discuss Springfield Armory XDms, and no 1911s in the mix.  Too much Glock love for me.  Just insufferable.  I admit I would like to have me some of that Ruger GP100.  We’ll see how it stacks up against my S&W R8.

Gun Grandstanding?

BY Herschel Smith
1 month, 3 weeks ago

Is that what this is?

A state law that exempts firearms manufactured in Kansas from all federal regulations has drawn a lot of attention recently — from both supporters and critics.

The Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence has filed a lawsuit about the 2013 law that declares the federal government has no authority to regulate guns, ammunition and accessories manufactured, sold and kept in Kansas. The Brady Center said the law is an unconstitutional attempt to nullify federal gun laws.

Gov. Sam Brownback’s re-election campaign used the lawsuit as a springboard to send out a fundraising email saying the Brady Center was suing the governor “for protecting the Second Amendment rights of Kansans.”

Regardless of which side of this debate you’re on, the “Second Amendment Protection Act” certainly raises some interesting issues.

The statute makes it a felony for any federal employee to enforce federal gun regulations on Kansas only-weapons. It also says no state or local officials can attempt to enforce any federal gun regulations on Kansas-only weapons.

The Brady Center lawsuit already guarantees that this state law is headed to federal court. What will happen if the state tries to charge a federal official with a felony for trying to enforce a federal law?

The law declares that Kansas-only guns are exempt from any federal regulations. So what, if any, regulations will those firearms be subject to? Will Kansas manufacturers now be allowed to make guns without serial numbers, making it difficult to trace any gun involved in a crime? Can they legally make guns that can elude mental detectors or other security devices? Can such guns be sold without the background checks required by federal law? …

It’s pretty obvious that the Second Amendment Protection Act was intended more as a political protest than as a practical benefit for Kansans. Only time will tell how many tax dollars the state will spend to defend a law that has little chance of standing up to constitutional scrutiny.

I don’t know if the fine people of Kansas have the brawn to take this to its logical conclusion or not.  If it’s political grandstanding as the editorial says, then they wasted their time and made a mockery of themselves and the legislative process.  If they intend to fold like a cheap tent at the first sign of a federal judge who has become indignant over this, then they should have stayed home.  Their laws are worthless, and that means that the folks in Kansas have no reason to respect the other laws any more than the feds respect this one.  It’s one sure way to lose the mandate of heaven.

But … if they intend to press the issue, then this will stand out as a great case study in nullification.  Nullification could be interpreted as state nullification of onerous federal laws, or jury nullification of prosecutor’s cases in federal court by turning their heads.  After all, federal laws are meaningless if not enforced, and actual, real people must enforce them.

What will happen “if the state tries to charge a federal official with a felony for trying to enforce a federal law?”  The federal official should be put in the state penitentiary with the general prison population for breaking state laws, and state law enforcement shouldn’t cower to federal LEOs while they’re doing this.

The answer to all of the questions about what will happen if, when and how, is that state laws, whatever they are at the time, will be enforced and federal laws will be ignored.  Question(s) posed, question(s) answered without fuss.  But there is the dark possibility that the editorial page has the politicians’ number.  Will they show themselves to be all bark and no bite?  The folks in Kansas might want to frame the issue for their representatives, if you know what I mean.

Illinois Governor Quinn Calls For Assault Weapon Ban

BY Herschel Smith
2 months ago

Illinois Governor Quinn is still pushing an “assault weapon” ban.

Gov. Pat Quinn is making another push on gun legislation, including an assault weapons ban.

The governor made an appearance Sunday on behalf of the Illinois Public Safety Act, which was introduced in the spring legislative session but not acted upon.

Part of the measure is a ban on assault weapons. “Part of fighting against the violence is to put a ban on assault weapons. Assault weapons have been used over and over again to kill people. We’ve gotta put an end to that,” Quinn said.

The bill also would ban high-capacity magazines, but anybody who legally owns these weapons could keep them, or transfer them to a family member.

With that last stipulation he’s throwing a bone, and gun owners won’t go for it.  So, a note to Springfield Armory and Rock River Arms, both of which manufacturers have made firearms I own (and like very much).

How long with you stay in Illinois where there is hostile terrain?  Haven’t you learned anything from Mossberg, Ruger, PTR and many others?  Don’t you understand that you are harming your brand by operating in an environment hostile to firearms?  Will you be the next firearms manufacturer to do the right thing?

Gun Manufacturers Doing The Right Things

BY Herschel Smith
2 months ago

Via Mike Vanderboegh, news on Mossberg:

America’s largest shotgun manufacturer, O.F. Mossberg & Sons, Inc., decided not to expand in Connecticut. Sure it was founded there 1919 and still has its corporate headquarters in North Haven. But in 2013 Connecticut rushed through legislation to ban some of Mossberg’s popular products. As a result, Mossberg CEO, Iver Mossberg, says, “Investing in Texas was an easy decision. It’s a state that is not only committed to economic growth but also honors and respects the Second Amendment and the firearm freedoms it guarantees for our customers.”

Mossberg has instead expanded its Maverick Arms, Inc. facility in Eagle Pass, Texas, with 116,000 new square-feet of factory space. Mossberg is not a small gun manufacturer. According to records kept by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), Mossberg made 475,364 guns in America in 2011. Of those guns, a total of 423,570 were shotguns made for sportsmen, for shotgun sports enthusiasts, for law-enforcement and for people who want a shotgun to protect their homes and families.

More than 90 percent of Mossberg’s guns are now made in Texas. Some of its Connecticut jobs are going there, too. Tom Taylor, O.F. Mossberg & Sons’ senior vice president, sales & marketing, tells me, “We’re moving all wood gun stock production to our Texas facility. More of our product lines—like our modern sporting rifles—might move to Texas in the future.

Good.  Now I won’t hesitate to buy those Mossberg shotguns I’ve had my eye on.

In other news, Daniel Defense once made their financing available only to LEOs, something about which I complained.  They’ve changed their position.

Unlike with previous attempts at financing that offered Law Enforcement payment plans on LE Packages, now all qualifying customers will have the ability to finance Daniel Defense complete rifles, upper receiver groups and other products.

“We ran into a few issues with the past program and decided it best to end the option until we could provide a solution agreeable to all our valued customers,” says Hunter.

Now Daniel Defense just needs to back off of their high prices some and maybe they could compete with Rock River Arms for volume.

Smith & Wesson, are you watching other gun manufacturers do the right thing?  Are you listening?  Are you still selling guns to LEOs in California that ordinary citizens cannot have?  Remember that we discussed this issue, and you never got back to me?

SOF Prefers 9mm Over .45 Caliber?

BY Herschel Smith
2 months ago

Military.com:

Many readers are under the impression that U.S. special operations forces have returned to using .45 caliber pistols since the adoption of the M9 9mm in 1985.

This has some truth to it, but in most cases SOF units use 9mm, experts maintain.

The Army’s Delta Force adopted .40 caliber, but the elite unit is having the same problems as the FBI – the heavier caliber is causing excessive wear problems in guns that were originally designed to be 9mm. Delta is now using 9mm Glock 17s, 19s and 34s.

DEVGRU, or SEAL Team 6, does use Heckler & Koch .45 for special occasions when they need a suppressed capability.

Now about two years ago, Marine Corps Special Operations Command awarded a $22.5 million contract to Colt Defense LLC for new .45-caliber Close Quarter Battle Pistols for the service’s elite special operations troops.The Colt 1911-style pistol replaced the fleet of worn-out Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command, or MARSOC, M45 pistols.

The Corps began issuing custom 1911 .45 pistols to its elite Force Reconnaissance units in the 1990s. Gunsmiths at the Quantico Weapons Training Battalion Precision Weapons Section hand built them from old 1911s that had been replaced by the M9 in the mid-1980s.

The creation of the first MARSOC units in 2006 caused the requirement to grow from 400 pistols to 4,000 pistols. Finding enough surplus 1911s for the Precision Weapons Section’s custom rebuilds became impractical, Marine officials maintain.

Most MARSOC operators, however, are not carrying their nifty new .45s because units are having a problem getting .45-caliber ammo in theater for some reason, sources maintain.

The rest of the Marine Corps uses the M9A1, an upgraded M9 the service adopted in 2006. It features a rail for attaching lights or lasers, checkering on the front and back of the grip and a beveled magazine well for smoother magazine changes.

It’s a fact that larger .40 caliber and .45 caliber rounds are very accurate in the hands of a well-trained shooter and create a larger wound cavity in the body when compared to the 9mm.

But that doesn’t mean they make a better choice for a military pistol caliber than the 9mm round – especially when you consider that the majority of the military’s most elite units continue to use the 9mm NATO round.

First of all, I find the notion that use of .40 in frames allegedly built for 9mm causing additional wear extremely unlikely.  Readers may want to weigh in themselves.  The springs (and spring constants) are almost identical.

Other than larger magazine capacity I cannot think of a single reason to select 9mm over .45.  Of course, I shoot .45 simply because I shoot it better than either 9mm or .40.  The chamber pressure for .45 is lower than for the 9mm or .40 (about 25,000 psi for the .45, about 35,000 psi for both the 9mm and .40).  The increased chamber pressure for the 9mm and .40 makes their barrels “snappy” compared to the .45.  Readers know what I’m talking about.

I would take my trusty Springfield Armory XDm .45 with me anywhere and under any circumstances.  I could probably beat it with a sledgehammer and would still put rounds down range.  If not the XDm, I would carry my Smith & Wesson E Series 1911 .45.

As for H&K, my reaction is much the same as correia45 regarding their attitude towards customers.

At HK, we stuck a piston on an AR15, just like a bunch of other companies have done, dating back to about 1969. However ours is better, because we refuse to sell it to civilians. Because you suck, and we hate you.

Our XM8 is the greatest rifle ever developed. It may melt, and it doesn’t fit any accessories known to man, but that is your fault. If you were a real operator, you would love it. Once again, look at Rainbow Six, that G36 sure is cool isn’t it? Yeah, you know you want one.And by the way, check out our new HK45. We decided that humans don’t need to release the magazine with their thumbs. If you were a really manly teutonic operator, you would be able to reach the controls. Plus we’ve fired 100,000,000 rounds through one with zero malfunctions, and that was while it was buried in a lake of molten lava, on the moon. If you don’t believe us, it is because you aren’t a real operator.

By the way, our cheap, mass-produced, stamped sheet metal guns like the G3 and MP5 are the bestest things ever, and totally worth asinine scalpers prices, but note that cheap, mass-produced, stamped sheet metal guns from other countries are commie garbage. Not that it matters, because you’re civilians, so we won’t sell them to you anyway. Because you suck, and we hate you, but we know you’ll be back. We can beat you down like a trailer park wife, but you’ll come back, you always do.

Buy our stuff.

Sincerely

HK Marketing Department.  Because you suck.  And we hate you.

I see H&Ks and slide right past them without even a second glance at the gun store.

Firearms,Guns Tags: ,

The ‘Only Ones’ Get Their Guns

BY Herschel Smith
2 months, 1 week ago

Kurt Hofmann:

Ludicrous indeed, but one wonders if a Maryland police chief would have found it so ludicrous for a non-”Only One” to be similarly disarmed. The surprising–and somewhat disappointing–aspect of this is that judging by some gun rights advocates’ Facebook posts, Ikea’s actions were more offensive than other establishments’ “gun free zone” endeavors, by virtue of the fact that they dared disarm an “Only One.”

This correspondent would argue, on the other hand, that Ikea’s willingness to be consistent, and apply its “disarmed victim zone” rules to everyone, even those bedecked in the trappings of government authority, is the one thing they got right. Well, except for the fact that it didn’t last …

Here are a couple of the salient problems.  First of all, folks like Ikea don’t think enough about the moral implications of self defense.  Second, they don’t consider the legal implicatiosn of self defense.  Most people are too busy lapping up the scraps their government feeds them to  ponder things like the Supreme Court ruling in Tennessee Versus Garner.  The Supreme Court has ruled that law enforcement officers carry weapons for exactly the same reason as anyone else – for self defense.  They aren’t supposed to use them for any other reason.

So what Ikea is saying by recognizing law enforcement officers and their right to carry is that they have a right to self defense, but the rest of us don’t.  Consider that the next time you think about buying from Ikea.  Another report was filed by Emily Miller.  The D.C. police are getting new patrol rifles.

WASHINGTON – FOX 5 has learned that D.C. police are getting new, modern rifles. It is part of the department changes after the Navy Yard shooting last September.

The first officers who rushed into Navy Yard were First District officers — who only had old rifles too long to get through the doors and narrow cubicles where Aaron Alexis was hiding.

So special operations and other law enforcement agents took over the chase with shorter, modern rifles. But we have now learned that all police officers will be armed with the new rifles.

[ ... ]

“If I come in with this rifle, it’s too long so I can’t enter the door without lowering the barrel, so it puts me at a tremendous disadvantage,” said Harris. “With the M4, it’s a much shorter weapon. I can keep the muzzle up, I’m on point and I can clear the room.”

So, D.C. police decided to replace the old guns with brand new rifles straight from the manufacturer. No more hand-me-downs.

According to Colt, the Metropolitan Police Department bought the model LE6920 rifles in February. They are 5.56 caliber and can only fire semi-auto.

Police have started training with them, but have not put it in the field yet.

The new Colt rifle which the Metropolitan Police Department bought is based on the M4.

I don’t buy the notion that a few inches of barrel length made any difference.  My son cleared rooms in Fallujah with his SAW.  The D.C. police are just incompetent.  But I also don’t begrudge them the right to have good patrol rifles, as long as they use them as discretely as I use mine (when I open carry, I don’t carry a long gun, and I wouldn’t buy Colt).  Also, without honoring the right to privacy and safety in our own homes from SWAT invasions, they should have all of their guns taken away from them like the out-of-control children they are.  But I do indeed begrudge them the right to have something that others cannot.  Oh, and a quick note to Emily.  5.56 mm is not 5.56 caliber (caliber is by definition the diameter measurement in inches).

In another article David Codrea notes a two-fisted approach by one manufacturer.

Well, while the right hand is providing American riflemen (albeit well-heeled ones, if you take a look at some of their prices) a chance to apply for one of their limited supply systems, the left hand is urging the government to adopt its patented technology for the Holy Grail behind the ultimate purpose of so-called “smart guns,” the ability for “authorities” to turn them off. Automatically.  “TrackingPoint patents technique to disable guns near schools and ‘gun free zones…’”

They can keep their gadgetry.  I like the idea of learning to use a rifle scope old-school.  On one hand, I’m glad this came up so that we know.  On the other hand, may the makers of Tracking Point live with bed bugs, lice and scabies, and may the fleas of a thousand camels infest their armpits.

Related: Open Letter To COSTCO

Remington Settles Trigger Issues

BY Herschel Smith
2 months, 1 week ago

Recall what I previously said about Remington trigger issues?

Remington 700 models have always had trigger issues, and it isn’t at all apparent that this recall is the same one that has caused Remington such problems in the past.

[ ... ]

The most comprehensive and damning indictment of Remington and its trigger problems to date is still this article from Billings Gazette.  See especially this evidence in the margins of the article, and this evidence, and this evidence, and the rest of the evidence.

The original article discusses “Senior Engineers” with Remington.  I’m particularly partial to this work title, and I am a registered professional engineer.  Are these folks registered as PEs with the state?  If not, why?  We are rightly concerned about roads, bridges and buildings, power plants and their proper design.  Why not guns, and why shouldn’t these engineers be registered?

If they are, has the issue of Remington and the apparent internal evidence ever come to light with the state board of registration?  Why would senior engineers ignore evidence of improper function of machines they designed and manufacture?  Did these engineers consider it malfeasance to ignore such evidence, and if they didn’t see it or didn’t know the evidence existed, why not?

We have many more questions than we have answers.  It has been this way for a very long time with Remington.

I’m an engineer.  I simply won’t tolerate bad designs or professional malfeasance.  And it looks like Remington is making good on their design.

The Remington Arms Co. has reached a nationwide settlement of claims that most of its Model 700 bolt-action hunting rifles have a defective trigger mechanism – a settlement likely to include the recall of millions of the popular firearm.

Attorneys for Remington and the plaintiffs in the class-action lawsuit against the company did not respond Monday to requests for comment on a “notice of settlement” filed last week in federal court in Missouri.

Yet Richard Barber, a Montana man who’s been saying for a dozen years that many of the Model 700 are defective and should be recalled, indicated Monday that a recall is part of the settlement.

“It does accomplish what I want to accomplish,” he told the Lee Newspapers State Bureau. “I guess it’s safe to say, it’s better late than never. …

“As a whole, (the settlement) represents the best interests of the public. It will save lives, it will save limbs.”

The lawsuit says more than 5 million Model 700 bolt-action rifles have been sold since 1962.

Barber’s 9-year-old son, Gus, was killed by a Model 700 rifle in a 2000 hunting accident in Montana. The family says the rifle fired when Barber’s wife, Barbara, released the safety as she prepared to unload the weapon. The bullet passed through a horse trailer and hit Gus, who was standing behind the trailer.

For more than a decade, Barber investigated the rifle’s trigger mechanism, compiled company internal documents and worked as a consultant on lawsuits from Model 700 owners whose rifle fired without the trigger being pulled.

He concluded that a defect in the Walker Fire Control on the trigger mechanism led to the incidents, sometimes causing the weapon to fire when the safety was released or the bolt was opened or closed.

The Walker Fire Control has been installed on Remington Model 700s and some other Remington rifle models since the 1940s. The company introduced a new fire-control mechanism, the X-Mark Pro, in 2006.

Barber, contacted by telephone Monday, declined to discuss details of the settlement, saying he doesn’t want to harm discussions still under way between the plaintiffs and the company.

The settlement notice, filed last Wednesday, is in a class-action lawsuit filed January 2013 in U.S. District Court in Missouri, by Ian Pollard, who purchased a Remington Model 700 rifle in 2000 in Belle, Mo.

Pollard’s lawsuit, filed against Remington and two affiliated companies, Sporting Goods Properties and E.I. DuPont, said his rifle had fired three times without him pulling the trigger, twice when the safety was released and once when the bolt was opened.

“Defendants have known since 1979 that at least 1 percent of all Model 700 rifles at that time would `trick,’ allowing them to fire unexpectedly without a trigger pull,” the suit said. “(Pollard) contends that this percentage is vastly understated and that all Model 700 rifles are subject to unexpected firing without a trigger pull.”

Pollard’s lawsuit asked the court to declare all Model 700 bolt-action rifles with a Walker Fire Control to be defective and to order Remington to recall those models. It also asked for compensatory and punitive damages against the company.

Last week’s notice said a settlement agreement will be submitted to U.S. District Court in Missouri by Oct. 30, after which the court will decide whether to approve it.

There are other steps to take for Remington to regain their lost loyalty, like relocating manufacturing South and out of union territory.

What The Left Doesn’t Understand About The Gun Ownership Debate

BY Herschel Smith
2 months, 1 week ago

Mike (who isn’t a gun guy at all):

A close reading of sources from the debates over the Bill of Rights makes clear that individual gun ownership represented the ability of citizens to protect and defend their political rights; rights to free speech, free assembly, due process and the like. But the argument for gun ownership advanced by the NRA today, Ollie North’s appeals to patriotism notwithstanding, is based on the alleged social value of guns to protect us against crime. The NRA would never argue that the Glock in my pocket should be used to stop cops from coming through the door, but they insist that the same Glock is my first line of defense when a bad guy breaks down that same door.

Waldman clearly understands that by using the Second Amendment to justify gun ownership as a defense against crime, the pro-gun community has successfully restated the history of the Second Amendment to buttress a contemporary social justification for owning guns. Neither will be readily undone as long as gun control advocates believe they can respond to this strategy by stating and restating the “facts.” Remember “it’s the economy, stupid”? Now “it’s the guns.”

I’m not sure whether Mike argues for or against his thesis, intentionally or accidentally, or even if Mike knows what he wants his thesis to be.

But assuming that he knows the second amendment is about being the surest defense against government tyranny – whether an army or its close cousin, a police state – if he has just figured that out, he can join the millions who already know that and intended it to be that way.

As for the NRA, they do what’s expedient, but Mike is stuck in a world in which large organizations develop talking points for idiots and the idiots vote the talking points.  The left operates that way, so they naturally assume that the rest of the world does as well.

But it doesn’t.  Katie Pavlich notes that at least half of the country believes ownership of a weapon is patriotic.  Try as they may like, the real intentions behind the second amendment cannot be hidden by the left, despite its reinterpretation and deconstruction.

As for the notion of gun ownership being a right because of the need for self defense, we’ve dealt with that before.  The second amendment was written within the context of everyone already owning guns because of the moral duty of self defense.

But the second amendment says nothing about self defense or hunting.  It says everything about tyranny.  My main intention here is to point out that whether the NRA recasts this issue or not, the context of guns in America cannot be undone or written out of the textbooks.  Men and women had them anyway, not armories or townships.  It’s ludicrous to argue that folks shouldn’t be able to bear arms individually because of the second amendment.  This misreads history, and badly so.

What the author is calling a “contemporary social justification for owning guns” is nothing of the sort.  God gives me the right to bear arms, not the state, the second amendment or any law or regulation.  The author only says the things he does because his understanding of history, theology and ethics is bankrupt and his thinking vacuous.

Chris Christie Vetoes New Jersey Gun Bill

BY Herschel Smith
2 months, 2 weeks ago

Chris Christie wants to be president.  He has vetoed the New Jersey gun bill.

Gov. Chris Christie today vetoed a gun control bill that would have reduced the permitted size of ammunition magazines, saying it would do nothing to reduce gun violence.

“This is the very embodiment of reform in name only. It simply defies common sense to believe that imposing a new and entirely arbitrary number of bullets that can be lawfully loaded into a firearm will somehow eradicate, or even reduce, future instances of mass violence,” Christie said. “Nor is it sufficient to claim that a ten-round capacity might spare an eleventh victim.”

Chris Christie made his fame in New Jersey as a gun controller.

Back then, Carroll was known for his staunchly conservative views (he’s a Civil War re-enactor with children named Benjamin Franklin and Robert E. Lee), which he often expressed in the opinion pages of the Daily Record. But today, Carroll is one of the four Republicans on the committee investigating Governor Christie over Bridgegate.

Christie and Merkt attacked Bucco and Carroll for what they called a “Guns for Votes” campaign, claiming they had a “radical plan to legalize assault weapons.”

It’s okay for people to change their mind or revisit issues, as long as they are serious about the change rather than doing it for political gain.  So what about the rest of Christie’s statement today?

But instead of a magazine size reduction, Christie proposed a new standard for involuntary commitment of patients who are not necessarily deemed dangerous “but whose mental illness, if untreated, could deteriorate to the point of harm.”

Christie also proposed new standards for recommending patients for involuntary outpatient treatment, “streamlining” patient transfers between inpatient and outpatient programs, new training programs for first responders likely to encounter unstable people with “modern techniques for de-escalation,” and to require people forced to undergo mental health treatment to demonstrate “adequate medical evidence of suitability” if they want to get a firearms purchase identification card.

Let that wash over you again.  Chris Christie is proposing what might be the most draconian mental health measures in the nation.  He wants to codify involuntary commitment of people who, in the estimation of someone approved by the state, deems that your mental health could deteriorate to the point of harm.

Furthermore, anyone who wants to carry a weapon must undergo forced mental health “treatment” to ascertain whether someone approved by the state deems you fit for your God-given duty of self defense.  Perhaps the belief that weapons are the best defense against tyranny would be reason enough not only to prohibit ownership of weapons, but also to involuntarily commit you to an institution.

Chris Christie, in attempting to shore up his credentials as a “conservative” candidate for president, has shown his true colors.  And we are the better for it.  Collectivists will be collectivists because that’s all they can be.  Can a leopard change its spots?

Prior:

Chris Christie’s Cowardly Dishonesty On Guns

Chris Christie Is A Gun Grabber


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