The Administration Implementation Of The Cloward-Piven Strategy

Herschel Smith · 29 Jun 2014 · 38 Comments

The setup for this has been occurring for quite a while.  The collectivists on the right have helped the leftists gain strength, but the rate and fury of activity that has been consequential in destabilizing the United States has increased almost beyond comprehension. The long term evolution of America to a position where such a strategy might stand a greater chance of success began long ago with the move towards urbanization.  The flight from rural America was helped along with family…… [read more]

New Taliban & Al Qaida Strategy

BY Herschel Smith
8 years, 1 month ago

A new strategy is becoming apparent with Al Qaida in Iraq, the Taliban and Al Qaida in Afghanistan and Pakistan.  This new strategy is working hand-in-glove with the left in America.

The Counterterrorism Blog has a very interesting commentary on the most recently released statement of Zawahiri.  As an editorial note, I have stopped dismissing these media releases as the rantings of an unhinged, deranged old coot, and I have started paying close attention to the contents.  I probably should have done this far sooner than I did.

Zawahiri tells us — whether by accident or intent — his strategy for the future.

Al Qaida number two, Dr Ayman Zawahiri issued a new tape calling on the Afghans to “rise against the Infidels (Kuffars) and their agents (the Karzai Government).” Following are few points of analysis and evaluation:

1) Attacking the US for its “killing of innocent Afghans and torture of Muslims.”

وندد الظواهري ?ي الشريط الذي بث على شبكة الإنترنت بمقتل مدنيين أ?غانيين على يد جنود أميركيين ?ي كابل يوم مايو/أيار

الماضي. واعتبر أن ذلك الحادث سبقته “سلسلة طويلة من قتل الأبرياء والاعتداء ?ي كابل وخوست وأورزغان وهلمند وقندهار وكونار،

Zawahiri develops two lines of attacks. One against Karzai by exposing what he calls “the US role in killing Afghan civilians in Kabul, Khust, Urzogan, Helmind, Kunar and Kandahar.” The accusation by Zawahiri of these killings comes at a time when Karzai himself is complaining (and has been for a while) about “civilian losses” in the ongoing battles with Taliban and al Qaida fighters. The design by Zawahiri is to corner Karzai with his own words. As shown clearly from al Jazeera’s panels, the strategy of the Jihadi propaganda and policy architects is to corner Karzai with accusations by Taliban and supporters that he is covering up for these losses. The Afghan Government would be walking on fine lines between responding to Zawahiri, as Karzai did, but also criticizing US and allies for their “faulty tactics.? In the mind of the Jihadi architects of politics, attacking Zawahiri won’t have additional effects on anyone, but criticizing one’s allies will have an effect on all parties: The US, Karzai and the Afghani public. 

Now, we knew some of this earlier, whether by real experience of the troops or by reporting.  For instance, Knight Ridder was reporting back in 2005 that the Taliban had reemerged as a revitalized and evolved force to deal with:

The Taliban insurgents have adopted some of the terrorist tactics that their Iraqi counterparts have used to stoke popular anger at the Iraqi government and the U.S. military. They’ve stalled reconstruction and fomented sectarian tensions in a country that remains mired in poverty and corruption, illegal drugs and ethnic and political hatred.

Their tactics include attacks with homemade explosives, and beheadings, assassinations and kidnappings targeting public officials and others who cooperate in international democracy-building efforts and reconstruction.

Also, this little gold nugget is informative.  Ed Morrissey makes the following point after reading that the Taliban “used women and children as human shields as they tried to escape into the mountains of Afghanistan.” Morrissey writes:

This has two purposes for the Taliban. First, it keeps Western forces from firing on them, as they know that Coalition troops will try to protect civilians where possible. Secondly as just as importantly from a strategic point of view, any women and children killed in the battle will almost certainly be blamed on the Western forces by the Western media. It allows the Taliban to continue their propaganda blitz against the West, one in which the media has unwittingly (in most cases) found themselves a pawn to the Islamists. 

The Taliban and Al Qaida had already known how to fight as a guerrilla organization using guerrilla tactics.  But this was only the beginning of the evolution to asymmetric warfare.  The terror, the beheadings, the kidnappings, the IEDs and so forth, all are part of this evolution to completely asymmetric war and away from conventional tactics.  The final part, it would seem, is very pragmatic and far less ideological than the Taliban and Al Qaida of old.  It is not too long ago that we grew tired of hearing about the godless infidels in the West and the intent on the part of Al Qaida to conquer the West for Allah.

The core of Al Qaida and the Taliban (and the insurgents in Iraq) still believe those things, but terror rather than ideology is the primary tool now of changing the hearts of the people.  The change does not so much have to be a love for Islam or Al Qaida, but rather, a hatred for the West and all of its alleged brutality.  Witness the attempt to convince the people that the West is perpetrating acts of torture on innocents in Afghanistan in the tape.

Also witness the same attempts in Iraq.  Whether Hamdaniya, Haditha or any other instance happens to be real or fabricated, the idea is the same.  Plant the seed in the minds of the people in order to sew hatred and discontent.

The leftist press in the U.S. becomes dupes of Al Qaida by publishing ridiculous pictures and making obscene moral equivalence arguments (see Andrew Sullivan’s twisted logic on Mark Levin).

Make no mistake about it.  The tactics of the future will be some or all of the following:

  1. Beheadings
  2. Kidnappings 
  3. Body mutilations and torture of those captured or kidnapped (don’t ever forget that ”The bodies were mutilated so badly that positive identification could not be made in Iraq.”)
  4. Use of women and children as shields
  5. Despicable acts of brutality, made to look as if coalition forces perpetrated the acts.
  6. “Witnesses” who saw coalition forces perpetrating the acts.  These “witnesses” will most likely be Sunni Iraqis.  The “witnesses” in Afghanistan will be mostly Taliban sympathizers.
  7. Vociferous media releases — whether Aljazeera, tapes by Zawahiri, “witnesses” who tell U.S. media embeds about “atrocities” committed by the U.S. troops, etc.  The goal will be simply to get the story out by whatever means is necessary.

Yes, the enemy has gotten quite clever and has adapted well to the importance of U.S. public perception.  He no longer cares about moving his ideology forward by preaching Islam, per se.  That will come later.  Winning the war, in his mind, requires tactics that are more practical and effective than he has employed before.  The aim will be to make U.S. troops less certain of what they are aiming at and less willing to pull the trigger, and consequently, to make Iraq a much more dangerous place for the U.S. troops. The corollary is that the U.S. public will tire of seeing these brutalities and support for the war will wane.  So goes the thinking, and this represents a real paradigm shift in their tactics.  The storied Bin Laden rebuke of Zarqawi for brutal tactics was either (less likely) a decoy, or (more likely) has been repudiated in order to increase effectiveness of the forces of terror.

It will work to the extent that the public vacillates on their support for the troops.  John Podhoretz made an excellent point last night over FNC, and more completely in a New York Post commentary he entitled “Torturers’ Hope.”  It is worth the reading, and so I will quote him at length:

But the kidnapping and apparent torture/murder of Privates Tucker and Menchaca may represent a new strategy. If similar kidnap efforts are successful, if this event was not a fluke but an ambitious new tactic to throw Coalition forces off-balance, then things are going to change in Iraq.

Al-Qaeda-in-Iraq likely hopes to make service personnel believe themselves at risk of death by torture from any band of Iraqis they encounter – so that they’ll act differently: cautious, suspicious, with the hypervigilance of someone in the midst of a battle. If it works, civilians who mean our armed forces no harm may find themselves shot or killed by mistake as a result of the hair-trigger posture our forces will have to assume to keep themselves safe.

Could anyone blame them?

The answer, of course, is yes. If this is a new strategy, it exists not only to terrorize American and Coalition forces but also to divide them from Iraqis – to sow fear and hostility that will go both ways, to cause an upsurge in resentment and anger toward U.S. forces.

Here at home, we know there is a very serious constituency for stories about Americans committing massacres against Iraqis – from news magazines that print unconfirmed accounts and run them as gospel to congressmen like John Murtha who feel free to say that servicemen and women as yet charged with no offense in the Haditha incident committed murder “in cold blood.”

Until now, it has been possible for Murtha and others to say their consuming interest in the alleged misconduct of U.S. forces is a fearless effort to get at the truth of what is going on in Iraq. They claim to speak on behalf of the servicemen and women who are, they believe, fighting in a pointless and useless war.

And even as they do so, they often can’t help but draw a complete moral equivalence between the actions of U.S. forces in Iraq and the conduct of the insurgent terrorists. Consider these sentences, published yesterday by the liberal blogger Jeralyn Merritt: “It’s hard to express the sinking feeling this news brings. What can you say to the families of these young men to help reduce their grief? When does it end? Torture is disgraceful. But the United States does not have clean hands.”

Before word came that the two Americans of blessed memory were possibly beheaded, the ur-blogger Andrew Sullivan wrote that he prayed for the safety of our soldiers but wondered how America could say it would be wrong for the insurgents to torture our guys when we supposedly torture their guys.

What will such people say about the actions of the military men and women who must do their jobs now in the wake of the unspeakable murders of Tucker and Menchaca?

Will this increasingly passionate refusal to draw distinctions between the actions of Americans at arms and the behavior of Islamofascist monsters continue?

Will they show support for our troops at the moment they most need it – real support, as opposed to crocodile tears and the displays of profound disrespect for their mission? Or will they continue to use any means possible – including harsh judgments of the horrifying split-second choices made by young men in a dangerous situation who have put their lives on the line for the rest of us – to get at the president whom Sullivan, with his typical tone of reserved understatement, yesterday called “shallow, monstrous, weak and petty”?

Will the news media treat our men and women at arms well at such a time by giving them the benefit of the doubt, or will they make another choice?

We shall see whether “I support the troops” is a phrase that means something.

Like a well-orchestrated and well-directed symphony, a symphony of death and torture, our enemies have found a weakness in the U.S. will … a chink in the armor as it were.

Will the U.S. “support the troops,” indeed?

New Taliban & Al Qaida Strategy

BY Herschel Smith
8 years, 1 month ago

A new strategy is becoming apparent with Al Qaida in Iraq, the Taliban and Al Qaida in Afghanistan and Pakistan.  This new strategy is working hand-in-glove with the left in America.

The Counterterrorism Blog has a very interesting commentary on the most recently released statement of Zawahiri.  As an editorial note, I have stopped dismissing these media releases as the rantings of an unhinged, deranged old coot, and I have started paying close attention to the contents.  I probably should have done this far sooner than I did.

Zawahiri tells us — whether by accident or intent — his strategy for the future.

Al Qaida number two, Dr Ayman Zawahiri issued a new tape calling on the Afghans to “rise against the Infidels (Kuffars) and their agents (the Karzai Government).” Following are few points of analysis and evaluation:

1) Attacking the US for its “killing of innocent Afghans and torture of Muslims.”

وندد الظواهري ?ي الشريط الذي بث على شبكة الإنترنت بمقتل مدنيين أ?غانيين على يد جنود أميركيين ?ي كابل يوم مايو/أيار

الماضي. واعتبر أن ذلك الحادث سبقته “سلسلة طويلة من قتل الأبرياء والاعتداء ?ي كابل وخوست وأورزغان وهلمند وقندهار وكونار،

Zawahiri develops two lines of attacks. One against Karzai by exposing what he calls “the US role in killing Afghan civilians in Kabul, Khust, Urzogan, Helmind, Kunar and Kandahar.” The accusation by Zawahiri of these killings comes at a time when Karzai himself is complaining (and has been for a while) about “civilian losses” in the ongoing battles with Taliban and al Qaida fighters. The design by Zawahiri is to corner Karzai with his own words. As shown clearly from al Jazeera’s panels, the strategy of the Jihadi propaganda and policy architects is to corner Karzai with accusations by Taliban and supporters that he is covering up for these losses. The Afghan Government would be walking on fine lines between responding to Zawahiri, as Karzai did, but also criticizing US and allies for their “faulty tactics.? In the mind of the Jihadi architects of politics, attacking Zawahiri won’t have additional effects on anyone, but criticizing one’s allies will have an effect on all parties: The US, Karzai and the Afghani public. 

Now, we knew some of this earlier, whether by real experience of the troops or by reporting.  For instance, Knight Ridder was reporting back in 2005 that the Taliban had reemerged as a revitalized and evolved force to deal with:

The Taliban insurgents have adopted some of the terrorist tactics that their Iraqi counterparts have used to stoke popular anger at the Iraqi government and the U.S. military. They’ve stalled reconstruction and fomented sectarian tensions in a country that remains mired in poverty and corruption, illegal drugs and ethnic and political hatred.

Their tactics include attacks with homemade explosives, and beheadings, assassinations and kidnappings targeting public officials and others who cooperate in international democracy-building efforts and reconstruction.

Also, this little gold nugget is informative.  Ed Morrissey makes the following point after reading that the Taliban “used women and children as human shields as they tried to escape into the mountains of Afghanistan.” Morrissey writes:

This has two purposes for the Taliban. First, it keeps Western forces from firing on them, as they know that Coalition troops will try to protect civilians where possible. Secondly as just as importantly from a strategic point of view, any women and children killed in the battle will almost certainly be blamed on the Western forces by the Western media. It allows the Taliban to continue their propaganda blitz against the West, one in which the media has unwittingly (in most cases) found themselves a pawn to the Islamists. 

The Taliban and Al Qaida had already known how to fight as a guerrilla organization using guerrilla tactics.  But this was only the beginning of the evolution to asymmetric warfare.  The terror, the beheadings, the kidnappings, the IEDs and so forth, all are part of this evolution to completely asymmetric war and away from conventional tactics.  The final part, it would seem, is very pragmatic and far less ideological than the Taliban and Al Qaida of old.  It is not too long ago that we grew tired of hearing about the godless infidels in the West and the intent on the part of Al Qaida to conquer the West for Allah.

The core of Al Qaida and the Taliban (and the insurgents in Iraq) still believe those things, but terror rather than ideology is the primary tool now of changing the hearts of the people.  The change does not so much have to be a love for Islam or Al Qaida, but rather, a hatred for the West and all of its alleged brutality.  Witness the attempt to convince the people that the West is perpetrating acts of torture on innocents in Afghanistan in the tape.

Also witness the same attempts in Iraq.  Whether Hamdaniya, Haditha or any other instance happens to be real or fabricated, the idea is the same.  Plant the seed in the minds of the people in order to sew hatred and discontent.

The leftist press in the U.S. becomes dupes of Al Qaida by publishing ridiculous pictures and making obscene moral equivalence arguments (see Andrew Sullivan’s twisted logic on Mark Levin).

Make no mistake about it.  The tactics of the future will be some or all of the following:

  1. Beheadings
  2. Kidnappings 
  3. Body mutilations and torture of those captured or kidnapped (don’t ever forget that ”The bodies were mutilated so badly that positive identification could not be made in Iraq.”)
  4. Use of women and children as shields
  5. Despicable acts of brutality, made to look as if coalition forces perpetrated the acts.
  6. “Witnesses” who saw coalition forces perpetrating the acts.  These “witnesses” will most likely be Sunni Iraqis.  The “witnesses” in Afghanistan will be mostly Taliban sympathizers.
  7. Vociferous media releases — whether Aljazeera, tapes by Zawahiri, “witnesses” who tell U.S. media embeds about “atrocities” committed by the U.S. troops, etc.  The goal will be simply to get the story out by whatever means is necessary.

Yes, the enemy has gotten quite clever and has adapted well to the importance of U.S. public perception.  He no longer cares about moving his ideology forward by preaching Islam, per se.  That will come later.  Winning the war, in his mind, requires tactics that are more practical and effective than he has employed before.  The aim will be to make U.S. troops less certain of what they are aiming at and less willing to pull the trigger, and consequently, to make Iraq a much more dangerous place for the U.S. troops. The corollary is that the U.S. public will tire of seeing these brutalities and support for the war will wane.  So goes the thinking, and this represents a real paradigm shift in their tactics.  The storied Bin Laden rebuke of Zarqawi for brutal tactics was either (less likely) a decoy, or (more likely) has been repudiated in order to increase effectiveness of the forces of terror.

It will work to the extent that the public vacillates on their support for the troops.  John Podhoretz made an excellent point last night over FNC, and more completely in a New York Post commentary he entitled “Torturers’ Hope.”  It is worth the reading, and so I will quote him at length:

But the kidnapping and apparent torture/murder of Privates Tucker and Menchaca may represent a new strategy. If similar kidnap efforts are successful, if this event was not a fluke but an ambitious new tactic to throw Coalition forces off-balance, then things are going to change in Iraq.

Al-Qaeda-in-Iraq likely hopes to make service personnel believe themselves at risk of death by torture from any band of Iraqis they encounter – so that they’ll act differently: cautious, suspicious, with the hypervigilance of someone in the midst of a battle. If it works, civilians who mean our armed forces no harm may find themselves shot or killed by mistake as a result of the hair-trigger posture our forces will have to assume to keep themselves safe.

Could anyone blame them?

The answer, of course, is yes. If this is a new strategy, it exists not only to terrorize American and Coalition forces but also to divide them from Iraqis – to sow fear and hostility that will go both ways, to cause an upsurge in resentment and anger toward U.S. forces.

Here at home, we know there is a very serious constituency for stories about Americans committing massacres against Iraqis – from news magazines that print unconfirmed accounts and run them as gospel to congressmen like John Murtha who feel free to say that servicemen and women as yet charged with no offense in the Haditha incident committed murder “in cold blood.”

Until now, it has been possible for Murtha and others to say their consuming interest in the alleged misconduct of U.S. forces is a fearless effort to get at the truth of what is going on in Iraq. They claim to speak on behalf of the servicemen and women who are, they believe, fighting in a pointless and useless war.

And even as they do so, they often can’t help but draw a complete moral equivalence between the actions of U.S. forces in Iraq and the conduct of the insurgent terrorists. Consider these sentences, published yesterday by the liberal blogger Jeralyn Merritt: “It’s hard to express the sinking feeling this news brings. What can you say to the families of these young men to help reduce their grief? When does it end? Torture is disgraceful. But the United States does not have clean hands.”

Before word came that the two Americans of blessed memory were possibly beheaded, the ur-blogger Andrew Sullivan wrote that he prayed for the safety of our soldiers but wondered how America could say it would be wrong for the insurgents to torture our guys when we supposedly torture their guys.

What will such people say about the actions of the military men and women who must do their jobs now in the wake of the unspeakable murders of Tucker and Menchaca?

Will this increasingly passionate refusal to draw distinctions between the actions of Americans at arms and the behavior of Islamofascist monsters continue?

Will they show support for our troops at the moment they most need it – real support, as opposed to crocodile tears and the displays of profound disrespect for their mission? Or will they continue to use any means possible – including harsh judgments of the horrifying split-second choices made by young men in a dangerous situation who have put their lives on the line for the rest of us – to get at the president whom Sullivan, with his typical tone of reserved understatement, yesterday called “shallow, monstrous, weak and petty”?

Will the news media treat our men and women at arms well at such a time by giving them the benefit of the doubt, or will they make another choice?

We shall see whether “I support the troops” is a phrase that means something.

Like a well-orchestrated and well-directed symphony, a symphony of death and torture, our enemies have found a weakness in the U.S. will … a chink in the armor as it were.

Will the U.S. “support the troops,” indeed?

Norman Mineta Leaves – Thank God!

BY Herschel Smith
8 years, 1 month ago

Announced during the last hour, Norman Mineta is leaving his post as Transportation Secretary.  Mineta is the only Democrat in the Cabinet, and is a Clinton appointment that Bush inexplicably left in office upon taking the reins at the White House.

Tony Snow will have nice things to say about him, but the fact is that 9/11 occurred on his watch.  And another fact is that while the hourly workers were ready to begin targeted searches (i.e., looking for those of Arab descent), Mineta continued the completely hapless policy of searching little old white ladies who use canes to walk.  Mineta is an inept stooge, and the U.S. is better off without him.

What is that I heard?  A tick upwards on the U.S. securometer?

Letter to the New York Times

BY Herschel Smith
8 years, 1 month ago

To: letters@nytimes.com

Attention: Benedict Arnold

You have recently made public information about a highly successful and until now secure government program to track finances in order to track terrorists.  This is what I would like you to plan on doing now.

Remember 9/11?  Well, when Al Qaida succeeds in destroying several subway cars, or manages to contaminate the drinking water supplies for New York City (and beyond), or takes out several more buildings, or guns down hundreds at the corner of Broadway and Fifth, or any other of the many deadly things that they could perpetrate on your beloved city …

I want you to go down to the scene of the disaster, help the victims, and keep saying this to yourself: “Public interest … public interest … this was all necessary because of public interest.”  I want you to attend the funerals of each and every victim, and sit and give the compelling argument to the families of each and every victim that this was necessary due to “public interest.”  Then when you stand before God to answer for all of your actions, I want you to discuss the “public interest” with Him.

Oh.  Let me know how it all goes.  I’ll be waiting to hear from you.

Herschel Smith

Like ADHD Children

BY Herschel Smith
8 years, 1 month ago

Like little ADHD children … unable to discriminate between a teacher talking and a fly on the wall … unable to distinguish one thing from another … unable to make distinctions in category … the raving moonbat liberals cannot keep from being exactly who they are at the very core.  “Mommy, MOMMY, !!!!MOMMY!!!! Go spank daddy.  He said I should share my toys!  I want some CANDY!!”

Welcome to Mike Lukovich’s twisted world at the Atlanta Constitution-Journal.  In the profoundly humorless, deadpan, and mockable cartoon below, the stooge and buffoon Lukovich has someone with an American flag reading a book of torture etiquette to someone in Al Qaida.  Uh huh.

 

 

Jodka’s Lawyer Just Interviewed on O’Reilly

BY Herschel Smith
8 years, 1 month ago

Joseph Casas, lawyer for Jodka (one of the Camp Pendleton 8) reports that he believes that the prosecution has a faulty understanding of the facts.  He questioned the interrogation tactics, stating that Jodka was interrogated for 7.5 hours non-stop, no water, no food, no restroom breaks.  Recently out of boot camp, when a Marine sees someone in charge (Casas said “suit”), his trained instinct is to obey orders (he was referring to the alleged “confession”).  Casas stated that the government would like you to think that there is a confession, and they have spun it that way, but that there is really no confession.  Finally, he said that they would move to suppress certain documents that were being called a confession.

Will continue to post updates (or new posts) on this as we proceed forward.

Jodka’s Lawyer Just Interviewed on O’Reilly

BY Herschel Smith
8 years, 1 month ago

Joseph Casas, lawyer for Jodka (one of the Camp Pendleton 8) reports that he believes that the prosecution has a faulty understanding of the facts.  He questioned the interrogation tactics, stating that Jodka was interrogated for 7.5 hours non-stop, no water, no food, no restroom breaks.  Recently out of boot camp, when a Marine sees someone in charge (Casas said “suit”), his trained instinct is to obey orders (he was referring to the alleged “confession”).  Casas stated that the government would like you to think that there is a confession, and they have spun it that way, but that there is really no confession.  Finally, he said that they would move to suppress certain documents that were being called a confession.

Will continue to post updates (or new posts) on this as we proceed forward.

U.S. Response to Torture of GIs?

BY Herschel Smith
8 years, 1 month ago

Mark Levin has this to say about the torture of the two GIs:

Meanwhile, two kidnapped U.S. soldiers were apparently brutally tortured and murdered today. And the question I pose to those who rightly honor the Greatest Generation is this: What would our country have done 60 years ago in response to this war crime? How would our political and military leadership have acted? By all accounts, they would have demanded severe retaliation and retribution. And by that I don’t mean “bringing the perpetrators to justice,? as if we’re talking about some law-enforcement response to a white-collar crime. No, I’m talking about a military response of such devastation that the enemy fears the consequences of future kidnappings and executions of our men and women in uniform. And that’s what’s missing in this war — the enemy does not fear us (at least not enough) and defeatism (rather than victory) is being preached from Capitol Hill and the news and editorial pages.

In contrast, below I discuss the U.S. forces “setting up shop” a half mile into Ramadi, with soldiers digging in and betting on when they will be attacked.  Now, it may not be that the people who tortured and killed our two GIs come from the same groups of vermin that infest Ramadi.  There are currently thought to be four insurgent groups in Ramadi:

  1. Ansar al-Sunnah
  2. Mujahideen Shura Council (MSC)
  3. The Mujahideen Army
  4. The Conquering Army in Iraq

So if it was what is left of Al Qaida that tortured and killed the two GIs, then going directly after the four groups — even if they were at one time affiliated with Zarqawi — would not strike directly at those responsible for the atrocity.  However, the point is still salient.  The question to be asked is this: do our enemies fear us?  If they do, then they do … all of them.  If any of them don’t, then we need to reevaluate our tactics and strategy.

The Camp Pendleton 8

BY Herschel Smith
8 years, 1 month ago

I made a phone call to Camp Pendleton I discussed here, asking why the Camp Pendleton 8 were in shackles without charges having been filed.  Now, I see that they have been charged.  Folks, I will weigh in later on this issue, but for now a brief note on the charging of the Camp Pendleton 8.  A comment was left on another post by Sanda and Dennis Leslie as follows:

We were outside Camp Pendleton on Saturday, June 17, with more than 300 people in support of the eight Marines. The media have ignored this. What will it take to bring this travesty to the attention of the disinterested public?

Thank you for this thoughtful comment.  June 17 was prior to the eight being charged, but this comment was left after the eight were charged.  Now, I do not profess to know the truthfulness of the accusations (nor do I know that the accusations are false).  The information we currently know seems to me to be highly problematic.  See this post at Riehl World View for more details.  Michelle Malkin has been tracking this story too.  What I do know is that most Americans have been a part of the legal process before, whether involving jury duty, answering for a speeding ticket, or something more serious.

We have all seen the turning of the wheels of justice.  Needless to say, the process is not without its hickups, its bumps and grinds, and its hitch in its git-along.  Many of us know a juror who said, “I wish I had known that before I voted on his guilt (or innocence).”  Many Americans have seen evidence excluded, or evidence fabricated.  Many Americans have also seen biased jurors.  And this is with American witnesses and in civilian affairs.  Now, add the problematic nature of the witnesses and the hatred for Americans that some Sunnis in Iraq have, and the process becomes even more clouded, in my opinion.

I did not, nor do I now, believe that it was justified to hold these men in the brig.  I think it is absurd to believe that they were actually a flight risk.  In my opinion, they get the benefit of the doubt until and unless there is overwhelming and highly compelling evidence of their guilt.

Do I trust the system?  Maybe — maybe not.  The system is not perfect any more than the people who are part of it are perfect.  As to the comment by Sandra and Dennis, I would not look for the main stream U.S. press to come to the aid of these men in uniform.  Since when has that ever happened?

Chaplain Faces Court Martial for Praying in Christ’s Name

BY Herschel Smith
8 years, 1 month ago

I have just spoken on the telephone with Lt. Gordon James Klingenschmitt.  It was a pleasant conversation, and the Lt. seems to me to be a sensible, amicable and educated man — certainly not a maverick .  He is facing court martial because he prayed in Christ’s name while in uniform at Lafayette Park.  There are many issues we are going to cover in the coming weeks on this story.  I will not let it die, no matter how small my blog is.  I will keep writing on this.  The facts will be laid out in detail in the coming days here at the Captain’s Journal; I recommend that you go to Klingenschmitt’s web site for further information.  But right now it seems appropriate to me to begin this coverage with a statement by one of my heros, Justice Antonin Scalia, from “Scalia Dissents,” Kevin A. Ring, Ed.:

“Church and State would not be such a difficult subject if religion were, as the Court apparently thinks it to be, some purely personal avocation that can be indulged entirely in secret, like pornography, in the privacy of one’s room.  For most believers, it is not that, and has never been.  Religious men and women of almost all denominations have felt it necessary to acknowledge and beseech the blessing of God as a people, and not just as individuals, because they believe in the “protection of divine providence,” as the Declaration of Independence puts it, not just for individuals but for societies; because they believe God to be, as Washington’s first Thanksgiving Proclamation put it, the “Great Lord and Ruler of Nations.”  One can believe in the effectiveness of such public worship, or one can deprecate and deride it.  But the longstanding American tradition of prayer at official ceremonies displays with unmistakable clarity that the Establishment Clause does not forbid government to accommodate it.”

I should also mention that I had sent a letter to the Marine Corps Times editor, who in turn sent the letter to the Navy Times editorial staff.  I received a request via e-mail from Deputy News Editor of the Navy Times, Mr. Philip Creed (pcreed@atpco.com, or 703.750.8747) to use my letter in an upcoming issue of the Navy Times.  I responded in the affirmative, and added that I was a Milblogger.  I later sent another note to Mr. Creed asking if the letter had been used, and he responded back that it had not (without explanation).  But earlier this letter was picked up by The North Carolina Conservative which published it on June 21, 2006.  This version of the letter included another web site that links to a strong response to the same thing attempted in the Air Force.

We will cover this document, Lt. Klingenschmitt’s court martial, and the details of the case in the coming weeks.  You will get to see the Constitution under attack from the very people who are sworn to defend it.  I will also cite the Oath of Enlistment that every Soldier, Marine, Sailor and Airman takes.  My son took it prior to Boot Camp at Parris Island.  I go into his room to read it often.  In the coming weeks, you will have the opportunity to compare this oath with the actions of the senior leadership within our military.  You can judge for yourself how they stack up.


26th MEU (10)
Abu Muqawama (12)
ACOG (2)
ACOGs (1)
Afghan National Army (36)
Afghan National Police (17)
Afghanistan (675)
Afghanistan SOFA (4)
Agriculture in COIN (3)
AGW (1)
Air Force (28)
Air Power (9)
al Qaeda (83)
Ali al-Sistani (1)
America (6)
Ammunition (12)
Animals in War (4)
Ansar al Sunna (15)
Anthropology (3)
AR-15s (34)
Arghandab River Valley (1)
Arlington Cemetery (2)
Army (34)
Assassinations (2)
Assault Weapon Ban (24)
Australian Army (5)
Azerbaijan (4)
Backpacking (2)
Badr Organization (8)
Baitullah Mehsud (21)
Basra (17)
BATFE (43)
Battle of Bari Alai (2)
Battle of Wanat (15)
Battle Space Weight (3)
Bin Laden (7)
Blogroll (2)
Blogs (4)
Body Armor (16)
Books (2)
Border War (6)
Brady Campaign (1)
Britain (25)
British Army (35)
Camping (4)
Canada (1)
Castle Doctrine (1)
Caucasus (6)
CENTCOM (7)
Center For a New American Security (8)
Charity (3)
China (10)
Christmas (5)
CIA (12)
Civilian National Security Force (3)
Col. Gian Gentile (9)
Combat Outposts (3)
Combat Video (2)
Concerned Citizens (6)
Constabulary Actions (3)
Coolness Factor (2)
COP Keating (4)
Corruption in COIN (4)
Council on Foreign Relations (1)
Counterinsurgency (214)
DADT (2)
David Rohde (1)
Defense Contractors (2)
Department of Defense (113)
Department of Homeland Security (9)
Disaster Preparedness (2)
Distributed Operations (5)
Dogs (5)
Drone Campaign (3)
EFV (3)
Egypt (12)
Embassy Security (1)
Enemy Spotters (1)
Expeditionary Warfare (17)
F-22 (2)
F-35 (1)
Fallujah (17)
Far East (3)
Fathers and Sons (1)
Favorite (1)
Fazlullah (3)
FBI (1)
Featured (159)
Federal Firearms Laws (14)
Financing the Taliban (2)
Firearms (238)
Football (1)
Force Projection (35)
Force Protection (4)
Force Transformation (1)
Foreign Policy (27)
Fukushima Reactor Accident (6)
Ganjgal (1)
Garmsir (1)
general (14)
General Amos (1)
General James Mattis (1)
General McChrystal (38)
General McKiernan (6)
General Rodriguez (3)
General Suleimani (7)
Georgia (19)
GITMO (2)
Google (1)
Gulbuddin Hekmatyar (1)
Gun Control (185)
Guns (493)
Guns In National Parks (2)
Haditha Roundup (10)
Haiti (2)
HAMAS (7)
Haqqani Network (9)
Hate Mail (7)
Hekmatyar (1)
Heroism (4)
Hezbollah (12)
High Capacity Magazines (11)
High Value Targets (9)
Homecoming (1)
Homeland Security (1)
Horses (1)
Humor (13)
ICOS (1)
IEDs (7)
Immigration (27)
India (10)
Infantry (3)
Information Warfare (2)
Infrastructure (2)
Intelligence (22)
Intelligence Bulletin (6)
Iran (169)
Iraq (377)
Iraq SOFA (23)
Islamic Facism (33)
Islamists (37)
Israel (17)
Jaish al Mahdi (21)
Jalalabad (1)
Japan (2)
Jihadists (70)
John Nagl (5)
Joint Intelligence Centers (1)
JRTN (1)
Kabul (1)
Kajaki Dam (1)
Kamdesh (8)
Kandahar (12)
Karachi (7)
Kashmir (2)
Khost Province (1)
Khyber (11)
Knife Blogging (2)
Korea (4)
Korengal Valley (3)
Kunar Province (20)
Kurdistan (3)
Language in COIN (5)
Language in Statecraft (1)
Language Interpreters (2)
Lashkar-e-Taiba (2)
Law Enforcement (2)
Lawfare (6)
Leadership (5)
Lebanon (6)
Leon Panetta (1)
Let Them Fight (2)
Libya (11)
Lines of Effort (3)
Littoral Combat (7)
Logistics (46)
Long Guns (1)
Lt. Col. Allen West (2)
Marine Corps (229)
Marines in Bakwa (1)
Marines in Helmand (67)
Marjah (4)
MEDEVAC (2)
Media (22)
Memorial Day (2)
Mexican Cartels (20)
Mexico (21)
Michael Yon (5)
Micromanaging the Military (7)
Middle East (1)
Military Blogging (26)
Military Contractors (3)
Military Equipment (24)
Militia (3)
Mitt Romney (3)
Monetary Policy (1)
Moqtada al Sadr (2)
Mosul (4)
Mountains (9)
MRAPs (1)
Mullah Baradar (1)
Mullah Fazlullah (1)
Mullah Omar (3)
Musa Qala (4)
Music (16)
Muslim Brotherhood (6)
Nation Building (2)
National Internet IDs (1)
National Rifle Association (13)
NATO (15)
Navy (19)
Navy Corpsman (1)
NCOs (3)
News (1)
NGOs (2)
Nicholas Schmidle (2)
Now Zad (19)
NSA (1)
NSA James L. Jones (6)
Nuclear (53)
Nuristan (8)
Obama Administration (203)
Offshore Balancing (1)
Operation Alljah (7)
Operation Khanjar (14)
Ossetia (7)
Pakistan (165)
Paktya Province (1)
Palestine (5)
Patriotism (6)
Patrolling (1)
Pech River Valley (11)
Personal (16)
Petraeus (14)
Pictures (1)
Piracy (13)
Police (98)
Police in COIN (3)
Policy (15)
Politics (131)
Poppy (2)
PPEs (1)
Prisons in Counterinsurgency (12)
Project Gunrunner (20)
PRTs (1)
Qatar (1)
Quadrennial Defense Review (2)
Quds Force (13)
Quetta Shura (1)
RAND (3)
Recommended Reading (14)
Refueling Tanker (1)
Religion (70)
Religion and Insurgency (19)
Reuters (1)
Rick Perry (4)
Roads (4)
Rolling Stone (1)
Ron Paul (1)
ROTC (1)
Rules of Engagement (73)
Rumsfeld (1)
Russia (27)
Sabbatical (1)
Sangin (1)
Saqlawiyah (1)
Satellite Patrols (2)
Saudi Arabia (4)
Scenes from Iraq (1)
Second Amendment (133)
Second Amendment Quick Hits (2)
Secretary Gates (9)
Sharia Law (3)
Shura Ittehad-ul-Mujahiden (1)
SIIC (2)
Sirajuddin Haqqani (1)
Small Wars (72)
Snipers (9)
Sniveling Lackeys (2)
Soft Power (4)
Somalia (8)
Sons of Afghanistan (1)
Sons of Iraq (2)
Special Forces (22)
Squad Rushes (1)
State Department (17)
Statistics (1)
Sunni Insurgency (10)
Support to Infantry Ratio (1)
Survival (9)
SWAT Raids (46)
Syria (38)
Tactical Drills (1)
Tactical Gear (1)
Taliban (167)
Taliban Massing of Forces (4)
Tarmiyah (1)
TBI (1)
Technology (16)
Tehrik-i-Taliban (78)
Terrain in Combat (1)
Terrorism (86)
Thanksgiving (4)
The Anbar Narrative (23)
The Art of War (5)
The Fallen (1)
The Long War (20)
The Surge (3)
The Wounded (13)
Thomas Barnett (1)
Transnational Insurgencies (5)
Tribes (5)
TSA (10)
TSA Ineptitude (10)
TTPs (1)
U.S. Border Patrol (4)
U.S. Border Security (11)
U.S. Sovereignty (13)
UAVs (2)
UBL (4)
Ukraine (2)
Uncategorized (38)
Universal Background Check (2)
Unrestricted Warfare (4)
USS Iwo Jima (2)
USS San Antonio (1)
Uzbekistan (1)
V-22 Osprey (4)
Veterans (2)
Vietnam (1)
War & Warfare (210)
War & Warfare (40)
War Movies (2)
War Reporting (17)
Wardak Province (1)
Warriors (5)
Waziristan (1)
Weapons and Tactics (57)
West Point (1)
Winter Operations (1)
Women in Combat (11)
WTF? (1)
Yemen (1)


Copyright © 2006-2014 Captain's Journal. All rights reserved.